Chihuly: Through the Looking Glass at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston


My installations are singular in scale, composition, and form.  At times they sit peacefully in nature, sometimes they hang from the ceiling or spring forth from walls.  In any setting, the color, form, and light unite to create something magical. - Dale Chihuly

When my daughter mentioned that there's a blown glass exhibit that's getting a lot of attention at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, I thought that I could potentially do a post linking it to the blown glass creation, "Kiosk of the Night Owls" that adorns the entrance to the Palais Royal metro station in Paris.  After seeing Dale Chihuly's "Through the Looking Glass", I realize that he has taken the art of glass blowing to new heights, both figuratively and literally, and merits a post all of his own.  Enjoy!

Ikebana Boat
Ikebana Boat
Mille Fiori ("A Thousand Flowers")
Mille Fiori ("A Thousand Flowers")
The best way to admire "Persian Ceiling" - from the floor!
Persian Ceiling
Neodymium Reeds on Logs

Chihuly's work, which was originally inspired by the glassblowers of Murano, Italy, is a complex symphony of vibrant colors and textures that is sure to delight everyone from small children to adults.  These photos are just a sampling of some of the stunning installations on exhibit at the Museum of Fine Art until August 7, 2011.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts

Comments

  1. test, my last two comments have not posted.

    ReplyDelete
  2. try again, I said that Chihuly doesn't really do much for me, he needs editing and lacks grace and elegance--very contrary to popular opinion. Looks like a trash heap.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I must disagree with Joseph the Butler. It seems extremely popular to slam Chihuly in the contemporary art world because of his mass appeal and vivid installations. However you feel about the design, Chihuly's work is unarguably conceptual and imaginative, alluding to the history of craft production in both Italy and the United States. His show for the MFA explores a unique ability to envelope the space in colored glass and to transform the typical gallery experience - something that artists like de Kooning or Hirst never accomplished.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Joseph, I'm going to have to disagree about the Chihuly installations. "Neodymium Reeds on Logs" was truly graceful - I kept looking at it and wondering why I was mesmerized by some glass rods stuck in some logs...It was the sheer elegance and simplicty of it that spoke to my soul. It was hauntingly beautiful.

    It was also wonderful to see how engaged all of the children were. I kept thinking that this is what art is about - inspiration.

    Sorry that you had problems posting - I checked all of my settings and can't figure out why it works some times and doesn't work other times.

    Thanks, ymyaskovskaya, for sharing your thoughts on Chihuly. As someone who doesn't know that much about art, I really enjoyed reading both Joseph and your comments because they caused me to pause and reconsider my own opinion.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Excellent way of explaining, and pleasant piece of writing to get information regarding my presentation subject matter, which i am going to convey
    in college.

    Feel free to visit my web site - organic linen sheets (http://laughinglounge.com)

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular Posts