Sunday, November 25, 2012

Sunday's Picture and a Song: Poilâne

While strolling the streets of Paris, Stéphane and I spied these petits pains prénom (first name rolls) at Poilâne on Boulevard de Grenelle. Unable to resist the temptation of sharing one of their warm apple pies on a chilly evening, we were lured into this Parisian bakery that's famous for its sourdough bread and "Punitions" ("Punishment") cookies. Why are they called "Punitions". This very interesting clip from the CBS television program "Sunday Morning" reveals the answer.

The next time you're in Poilâne, be sure to take a "Punitions" when you pay for your bread. The cashier offers one to all of their customers.

Have a wonderful Sunday!



Poilâne's sourdough bread with its signature "P".

17 comments:

  1. Cela me fait sourire .le mythe Poilane .Ce qui a sauvé .la boulangerie française, c,est un loi qui disait .qu,il y a des boulangers et des réchauffeurs de pain .Un boulanger est un artisan .Le pain est différent en fonction de la farine et de la façon dont il est cuit .pour moi poilane est une escroquerie .je travaille dans une minoterie, et poilane n,est plus une références .
    Un bon pain est fait par un artisan et en fonction du boulanger le pain est bon ou moins bon .En boulangerie il ne peut pas y avoir de chaines de boulangerie .

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    1. Thanks for commenting. I agree, of course, that there's a difference between bread that is fully produced by an artisan baker on the premises according to the "French Bread Law" and bread that is produced off site. As I don't like sourdough bread as much as baguettes, I only eat Poilâne bread when it's in onion soup or a croque madame. The Poilâne apple pies are my real weakness. I haven't come across any that I like as much in other bakeries.

      For anyone who is interested in knowing more about the French Bread Law, please click here to read a The Best Baguette in Paris, a post from the archives.

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  2. Great video today and (once translated), the comment from 'anonymous' was enlightening as well. My goodness, it is only November and my "must-see/do" list already requires a 3 ring binder!!

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    1. I always like watching the CBS Sunday Morning show and was pleased to see that they had made a video about Poilâne. That thick three ring binder is what will keep you coming back to Paris for years to come, I hope!

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  3. Hmmm, la première opinion est un peu fort. :) Mais je veux savoir ce qu'il (ou elle) estime être les meilleures boulangeries de Paris en ce cas.

    For me, I really like Poilâne's bread but there are also other boulangeries I like to visit! This post made me smile for another reason - this is the boulangerie right around the corner from my old apartment in the 15e and the one I have a lot of memories of. :)

    Milsters

    (www.littlepiecesoflight.com)

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    1. That must have been a fun place to live. Of course, I would have had a really hard time resisting the temptations of the little apple pies if I lived near Poilâne!

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  4. "le mythe Poilane"--sounds like fighting words.

    I believe my own Treasure Island ("The Most European Supermarket in America") sells Poilane bread, but sourdough isn't my favorite. And although I have an aversion to taking food that's sat on a counter (samples), I'd probably take a little punishment.

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    1. The good thing about the "Punitions" at Poilane is that they don't stay on the counter for long because they disappear at such a fast rate.

      I'm not a big fan of sourdough bread either but I do like it on top of French onion soup and when they use it to make croque monsieurs.

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  5. I like their rye bread studded with currants. I also like the fact that one of the names you photographed was Oceane -- one of my favorite French names.

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    1. That's funny that you mention the rye bread with currants because I tried a sample of it on Saturday night, right after I finished my "Punitions". It was good!

      I thought about naming our daughter Oceane but changed my mind when I realized that it might cause her problems in the USA.

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  6. I used to live up the street from this bakery and for some reason was always too intimidated to go in. Good thing I didn't know about these little punishments then, otherwise I'd really have a reason to be ill at ease!

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    1. Being too intimidated to go in a bakery doesn't sound like you at all, Mlle Ella!

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  7. Please tell me more about the warm apple pie! That doesn't sound very French to me, but it sounds delicious.

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    1. Click here to see a photo of the little apple pies. It's at the bottom of the post.

      The apple pies are the perfect combination of apples, cinnamon, sugar and an excellent crust. I really recommend that you try one, at least! If you take it home, be sure to warm it up a little bit in the microwave before you eat it.

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  8. Being a baker myself, I've got mixed feelings about the "Poilane" mythos. It seems to me that the main focus lies on a professional marketing and sales department which is promoting the emotional background story of the company. I'd suggest that you give your baker around the corner a chance who doesn't have the means to advertise his bread in the same manner, but who has probably as much experience and skill and knowledge as Poilane (if not more). Follow your tastebuds and you'll always find good things...

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  9. Mmmm! I can almost smell the bread baking.

    Love Denise

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  10. how wonderful Just found you via twitter guess I will be having to check out your posts from now on Homemade bread is just the best

    www.nycstylelittlecannoli.com

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